edkohler
edkohler:

liquidchroma:

thomaslowrysghost:

Historyapolis:

Ever wonder why it’s so hard to get a mixed drink south of Lake Street in Minneapolis? We can thank the historic “patrol limits,” which were incorporated into the city charter in the 1880s. The ordinance required bars and liquor stores to be concentrated in select parts of town, with the rationale that police could more easily control liquor-fueled crime if all of these types of businesses were in one place. The city’s largest liquor zone was the Gateway district on the banks of the Mississippi River. Another was the “Hub of Hell”—shown on this map at the intersection of 27th Avenue and 25th Street.  This map delineates the liquor patrol districts in 1935, about 18 months after Prohibition was rescinded. It also shows the 37 establishments allowed to serve liquor outside of the districts. This group includes legendary institutions like the Nankin Cafe and the Curtis Hotel; it also includes highly selective locales like the Minneapolis Club and the Minneapolis Athletic Club, which were renowned for barring anyone who did not belong to the city’s Yankee elite. City voters were being asked to determine whether these outliers could continue to serve liquor. Voters must have approved this request, as a defeat would have provoked a revolt of the well-heeled. The first families of Minneapolis would not have ventured into the increasingly seedy Gateway for their daily cocktail. The liquor patrol limits were rescinded in 1974, though it is still difficult in Minneapolis to get a liquor license or serve liquor outside of these historic limits.

(image and text via The Historyapolis Project Facebook page)

Ack! Well, come drink beer and wine AND NOTHING ELSE at an establishment south of Lake Street tonight, everybody.

Neighborhood drinking establishments of any kind are hard to find to the south of Lake. I think neighbors would know each other better if they had more of these. Longfellow’s benefitted a ton from the Riverview Wine Bar, Harriet Brewing, Merlin’s Rest, and the new Blue Door Pub, which all bring in a solid share of customers from within walking/biking distance.

I’ve also wondered how much Prohibition factors into this. Most of South Minneapolis was developed in the 20s, where each neighborhood had a corner store, but not a bar. This is very different than the older communities of NE Mpls, St Paul’s East Side, and even Seward

edkohler:

liquidchroma:

thomaslowrysghost:

Historyapolis:

Ever wonder why it’s so hard to get a mixed drink south of Lake Street in Minneapolis? We can thank the historic “patrol limits,” which were incorporated into the city charter in the 1880s. The ordinance required bars and liquor stores to be concentrated in select parts of town, with the rationale that police could more easily control liquor-fueled crime if all of these types of businesses were in one place. The city’s largest liquor zone was the Gateway district on the banks of the Mississippi River. Another was the “Hub of Hell”—shown on this map at the intersection of 27th Avenue and 25th Street.

This map delineates the liquor patrol districts in 1935, about 18 months after Prohibition was rescinded. It also shows the 37 establishments allowed to serve liquor outside of the districts. This group includes legendary institutions like the Nankin Cafe and the Curtis Hotel; it also includes highly selective locales like the Minneapolis Club and the Minneapolis Athletic Club, which were renowned for barring anyone who did not belong to the city’s Yankee elite. City voters were being asked to determine whether these outliers could continue to serve liquor. Voters must have approved this request, as a defeat would have provoked a revolt of the well-heeled. The first families of Minneapolis would not have ventured into the increasingly seedy Gateway for their daily cocktail. The liquor patrol limits were rescinded in 1974, though it is still difficult in Minneapolis to get a liquor license or serve liquor outside of these historic limits.

(image and text via The Historyapolis Project Facebook page)

Ack! Well, come drink beer and wine AND NOTHING ELSE at an establishment south of Lake Street tonight, everybody.

Neighborhood drinking establishments of any kind are hard to find to the south of Lake. I think neighbors would know each other better if they had more of these. Longfellow’s benefitted a ton from the Riverview Wine Bar, Harriet Brewing, Merlin’s Rest, and the new Blue Door Pub, which all bring in a solid share of customers from within walking/biking distance.

I’ve also wondered how much Prohibition factors into this. Most of South Minneapolis was developed in the 20s, where each neighborhood had a corner store, but not a bar. This is very different than the older communities of NE Mpls, St Paul’s East Side, and even Seward

Minnesota Breweries

I’ve been thinking of the insane amount of new breweries in town for a while, and I’m to the point where I think it could be ok.

The taproom idea basically creates a brewpub type business, but without the added costs of food and everything that goes with that. Just bring in a different food truck and all of a sudden you have a great place to go for a beer or two.

Now, not all these places will be able to bottle or can to sell at liquor stores, and they might not even be able to keg for other bars, but maybe a very small scale taproom is a good enough business plan. And you never know, one of these small startups could strike it big and expand into a full production brewery.

Maybe places like Indeed, Pour Decisions, Harriet, Excelsior Brewing, Lucid, and Steel Toe won’t be the next Surly, but that doesn’t mean they can’t exist as a business, especially if they serve their neighborhood and have reasonable expectations of their growth.

A Craft Brewery Overcomes a Frustrating State Law by OPEN Forum (by AmericanExpress)

Each week MSNBC’s Your Business features experts to share their secrets for improving your business. This week, a craft brewer in Minnesota saw a state law that he believed was standing in his way. Instead of just sitting back, the maker of beers like “Furious” and “Abrasive Ale” took his case to the state capitol and won.