edkohler
edkohler:

liquidchroma:

thomaslowrysghost:

Historyapolis:

Ever wonder why it’s so hard to get a mixed drink south of Lake Street in Minneapolis? We can thank the historic “patrol limits,” which were incorporated into the city charter in the 1880s. The ordinance required bars and liquor stores to be concentrated in select parts of town, with the rationale that police could more easily control liquor-fueled crime if all of these types of businesses were in one place. The city’s largest liquor zone was the Gateway district on the banks of the Mississippi River. Another was the “Hub of Hell”—shown on this map at the intersection of 27th Avenue and 25th Street.  This map delineates the liquor patrol districts in 1935, about 18 months after Prohibition was rescinded. It also shows the 37 establishments allowed to serve liquor outside of the districts. This group includes legendary institutions like the Nankin Cafe and the Curtis Hotel; it also includes highly selective locales like the Minneapolis Club and the Minneapolis Athletic Club, which were renowned for barring anyone who did not belong to the city’s Yankee elite. City voters were being asked to determine whether these outliers could continue to serve liquor. Voters must have approved this request, as a defeat would have provoked a revolt of the well-heeled. The first families of Minneapolis would not have ventured into the increasingly seedy Gateway for their daily cocktail. The liquor patrol limits were rescinded in 1974, though it is still difficult in Minneapolis to get a liquor license or serve liquor outside of these historic limits.

(image and text via The Historyapolis Project Facebook page)

Ack! Well, come drink beer and wine AND NOTHING ELSE at an establishment south of Lake Street tonight, everybody.

Neighborhood drinking establishments of any kind are hard to find to the south of Lake. I think neighbors would know each other better if they had more of these. Longfellow’s benefitted a ton from the Riverview Wine Bar, Harriet Brewing, Merlin’s Rest, and the new Blue Door Pub, which all bring in a solid share of customers from within walking/biking distance.

I’ve also wondered how much Prohibition factors into this. Most of South Minneapolis was developed in the 20s, where each neighborhood had a corner store, but not a bar. This is very different than the older communities of NE Mpls, St Paul’s East Side, and even Seward

edkohler:

liquidchroma:

thomaslowrysghost:

Historyapolis:

Ever wonder why it’s so hard to get a mixed drink south of Lake Street in Minneapolis? We can thank the historic “patrol limits,” which were incorporated into the city charter in the 1880s. The ordinance required bars and liquor stores to be concentrated in select parts of town, with the rationale that police could more easily control liquor-fueled crime if all of these types of businesses were in one place. The city’s largest liquor zone was the Gateway district on the banks of the Mississippi River. Another was the “Hub of Hell”—shown on this map at the intersection of 27th Avenue and 25th Street.

This map delineates the liquor patrol districts in 1935, about 18 months after Prohibition was rescinded. It also shows the 37 establishments allowed to serve liquor outside of the districts. This group includes legendary institutions like the Nankin Cafe and the Curtis Hotel; it also includes highly selective locales like the Minneapolis Club and the Minneapolis Athletic Club, which were renowned for barring anyone who did not belong to the city’s Yankee elite. City voters were being asked to determine whether these outliers could continue to serve liquor. Voters must have approved this request, as a defeat would have provoked a revolt of the well-heeled. The first families of Minneapolis would not have ventured into the increasingly seedy Gateway for their daily cocktail. The liquor patrol limits were rescinded in 1974, though it is still difficult in Minneapolis to get a liquor license or serve liquor outside of these historic limits.

(image and text via The Historyapolis Project Facebook page)

Ack! Well, come drink beer and wine AND NOTHING ELSE at an establishment south of Lake Street tonight, everybody.

Neighborhood drinking establishments of any kind are hard to find to the south of Lake. I think neighbors would know each other better if they had more of these. Longfellow’s benefitted a ton from the Riverview Wine Bar, Harriet Brewing, Merlin’s Rest, and the new Blue Door Pub, which all bring in a solid share of customers from within walking/biking distance.

I’ve also wondered how much Prohibition factors into this. Most of South Minneapolis was developed in the 20s, where each neighborhood had a corner store, but not a bar. This is very different than the older communities of NE Mpls, St Paul’s East Side, and even Seward

edkohler

edkohler:

besidestheobvious:

This article drove me to apoplexy.

The best big box store is no big box store. Imagine how much better the Hiawatha & Lake would be if there were businesses that served LRT travelers with residential units above them rather than a huge Target store with a parking lot and delivery docks taking up 2-3 more acreage than the store itself. That store and stores like it - regardless of brand - are not assets to their communities.

I have no problem with Target/Cub/Rainbow at that intersection, but how awesome would it be if the Target was like the one downtown, a two story store with no parking lot. And instead of Cub AND Rainbow, just one with a smaller parking lot. For me, the problem isn’t the big box store, it’s the big box store parking lot!

fightwithknives

Just a few thoughts on a great piece over at Fight with Knives

1. I love that the entire Twin Cities area is basically just referenced as Minneapolis. As it should be. :)

2. “No one neighborhood is cooler than any other neighborhood.” I’m guilty of this more than nearly everyone, as I love to rip St. Paul and Northeast, but for me it’s all in fun. I fully understand that Minneapolis is great because of all the amazing places all over the two cities. Even areas that people forget about, like North Minneapolis and the East Side of St Paul, are wonderful places and for the most part, great places to live. Find me another city that is even close to being as complete.

3. My perfect day would involve a bike ride around the creek, river and lakes of South Minneapolis, lunch at Shish in Mac Groveland, an afternoon Twins game downtown, dinner at The Strip Club, followed by some beers at basically any bar in either city

fightwithknives:

In honor of this momentous occasion, here are five things I’ve learned in my five years in Minneapolis:

  • Right now the Twin Cities are like that kid in high school who is generally cool but doesn’t have any self-esteem and is really self-obsessed, so does some occasionally lame things. It’s not that it’s harder to make friends here than anywhere else (it is hard to make friends everywhere after you graduate college); it’s that we’re obsessed with how we feel about it. Just make whatever friends, treat whoever like however, they will figure it out, stop thinking about yourself that way. You can do it. It’s like MPLS is Liz Lemon in high school - so much potential, but kinda mean because it’s so obsessed with being compared to others (you are going to bring up Portland again? ok, I’ll wait. And no one says hi to you on the street except for in the South, ok? That shit’s annoying.) Anyway, there’s a lot of potential bubbling under the surface right now, and one day Minneapolis will straighten up and grow up and own it, and that day is almost here.
  • No one neighborhood is cooler than any other neighborhood. Minneapolis and St. Paul are similarly badass. They all have equally sweet blocks and even better hidden secrets. South Minneapolis is as cool as Northeast, which rocks as much as the Northside and West St. Paul. You can find apartments with badass built-ins in every neighborhood.
  • The best place to meet a stranger with whom you would like to get down immediately is the 331 Club.
  • There are a lot of favorites everywhere, but a perfect day would involve a trip to Franconia, a visit to Selby & Snelling and dinner at 112 Eatery, capped off by a show at the Hexagon Bar.
  • It’s more than ok to be obsessed with Prince, still. It’s the coolest thing, actually. Every time it rains in this city a radio station is playing “Purple Rain.”

I have nothing but love for the Cities. Once I convinced a friend from out of town that Minneapolis’s slogan was “Let’s go crazy. Let’s get nuts.” Can we make that happen?